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Wednesday, April 20, 2011

CNN PRESENTS: THE WOMEN WHO WOULD BE QUEEN

CNN PRESENTS: THE WOMEN WHO WOULD BE QUEEN
REPORTED BY SOLEDAD O’BRIEN


CNN anchor and special correspondent Soledad O’Brien examines the lives of Catherine Middleton and Prince William in a documentary that explores how the future King and Queen have been influenced by the legacy of his mother, Princess Diana, and are forging a very modern royal marriage. O’Brien chronicles their friendship-turned-romance, and how they are preparing for an “ordinary” married life in North Wales following their nuptials.

video


AIRTIMES (All times Eastern)

Sunday, April 24, 2011
8:00pm – 9:00pm
11:00pm – 12:00am

Monday, April 25, 2011
2:00am – 3:00am

Saturday, April 30, 2011
8:00pm – 9:00pm
11:00pm – 12:00am

Sunday, May 01, 2011
2:00am – 3:00am



Speaking about young Prince William’s early life, Christopher Andersen, author of several books about the royal family, tells O’Brien that sometimes Princess Diana’s eldest son was a witness to his parent’s troubled marriage. Andersen suggests the prince’s early sad family experiences may yield insights into his deliberation for his own romantic life, and to what drew the prince to his fiancée.

“William became sort of ‘the fixer’ ... here’s this little boy when his mother locks herself in the bathroom after an argument with Charles, and she’s sobbing, and here’s little seven-year-old William slipping tissues under the door and saying, ‘I hate to see you sad, Mummy’ ... so ... he meets Kate and Kate exposes him to a happy family for the first time ....stability,” Andersen tells O’Brien in the documentary.

Young Diana and young Kate are described by friends as painfully shy. Princess Diana was said by many who knew her to have long nursed a crush on Prince Charles, and friends of Kate Middleton have related that, similarly Kate long admired William from afar. And in 2000, both Prince William and Katherine Middleton spent portions of their “gap” years, between secondary school and university, in volunteer service in Chile, though ironically, the two were on separate missions and never met.

Kate is said to have switched her initial selection of Edinburgh University to St. Andrews University shortly after the palace announced that Prince William would be attending university there, though later, it would be Kate who would encourage struggling student, Prince William, that he could indeed make it through their challenging courses. They both completed their studies in art history there.

After their graduations, their romance took on more public visibility – and became more complicated. Reminiscent of Princess Diana, paparazzi aggressively followed Kate, and Prince William worried about Kate’s safety. The prince entered his military training, and sometimes Kate was alone for long periods. Prince William broke off their relationship in 2007, after seeking counsel from his father. Of course, the world knows the couple later reconciled and the documentary gives details of their engagement, including how and where the prince popped the question.

O’Brien describes the ways in which the couple has seemed to pursue a strong foundation for marriage – living together for a time, taking premarital counseling, and preparing for a simple early married life far from Buckingham Palace. O’Brien also reports on the moving ways in which the couple is honoring the legacy of the prince’s mother in their marriage ceremony, including Prince William’s selection of the engagement ring for his bride-to-be, and in the location the couple will take their vows, Westminster Abbey.

Also featured in the documentary are interviews with Oliver Baines, a friend of Kate Middleton’s days at boarding school; Mary Clarke, Lady Diana’s nanny; Arthur Edwards, who has photographed both princes' lives during his 30-year career at The Sun newspaper; Berkshire pub owner and Middleton family friend John Haley; long-time friends of the couple Jules Knight and Richard Dennen; Dr. James Colthurst, Lana Marks, and Mary Robertson, long time friends of Princess Diana; Malcolm Sutherland, leader for Kate Middleton’s and Prince William’s separate Chilean volunteer service expeditions; Penny Walker, Lady Diana’s music teacher; Charles Warren, one of Prince William’s lecturers at St. Andrews; and Ken Wharfe, bodyguard for the royal family.

For more information follow the link to CNN's wedding website.


AIRTIMES (All times Eastern)

Sunday, April 24, 2011
8:00pm – 9:00pm
11:00pm – 12:00am

Monday, April 25, 2011
2:00am – 3:00am

Saturday, April 30, 2011
8:00pm – 9:00pm
11:00pm – 12:00am

Sunday, May 01, 2011
2:00am – 3:00am


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8 comments:

Anonymous said...

In reporting the upcoming wedding of the Royals, it should be a team effort for CNN.
Women anchors should be encouraged to participate and banter with Richard Quest. Women like to report on the style of the Monarchy and the tradition and viewers like to hear women because they inherently give a different slant on romantic observations and add the feminine touch.
There is no reason to depend on Anderson's banter with Quest.
Yes, he should cover this event, but CNN, please let people like Kiran, shine, for once. This is THEIR moment.

Anonymous said...

Kiran's presence wouldn't get me to watch this. I'm ONLY watching this BECAUSE Anderson is going to be involved and I'm sure there are others who feel the same.

Anonymous said...

Soledad's documentary skills are like no other and I am looking forward to seeing this as well.

Anonymous said...

There was an odd moment during 360 Wednesday night when they showed Soledad talking to someone off camera - apparently she didn't know she was on and had a fairly lengthy conversation until CNN cut the audio for several seconds and then Soledad realized something was happening and she finally said "I'm ready", but then they just went to a commercial. I don't know if that has anything to do with why she's not subbing tonight, but it sure was strange.

Anonymous said...

@4:15pm: What a shame.
Anderson wasn't even working at CNN when Diana's wedding was covered and yet millions, the world over watched.
While this will no doubt have lower ratings than Diana's, it is important to remember, no matter the event, "the News is the star."
That has been proven time and again by TVN and TV by the numbers.
Real news junkies watch THE NEWS.

Anonymous said...

1:08, I watch THE NEWS and I consider myself a real news junkie who watches a variety of anchors/reporters, however, when watching CNN, my preference is Anderson and has been for years. I feel absolutely no shame in admitting to that. I watched Anderson cover some other royal event several years ago with Quest and Becky Anderson and he was quite funny and entertaining. I wouldn't feel compelled to watch Kiran Chetry or any other anchor cover this event because it really doesn't interest me much, but because Anderson's a part of it, I don't want to miss it.

Anonymous said...

"Real News Junkies" elaborate on the news and not the anchor.
They depict the happenings of the show and dissect each segment.
They are able to analyze politics,
international affairs, and labor issues because they are able to intellectualize all of the above, no matter their age, and know intuitively that all of these issues will effect them in later years.
Their focus is not the anchor, but what the anchor is saying.
Whether it is CNN, MSNBC, or FOX, SERIOUS news junkies don't actually care who does the delivery as long as it is delivered in an accurate up to date manner.
I congratulate most of the regular contributors here because you can tell those that are seriously interested in programming issues and news, and those who are not.

Anonymous said...

I congratulate most of the regular contributors here because you can tell those that are seriously interested in programming issues and news, and those who are not.

You have some sort of rigid rule about individuals are supposed to watch news and somehow if it doesn't fit your narrative, then they aren't "seriously" interested. You are incorrect in your assumptions. If the anchor meant nothing to viewers, news organizations wouldn't make a point to search for people who appeal to the public and surely they expect that anchor to attract viewers. It is not a crime to find certain anchors more appealing than others and still be a serious viewer of the news, this is quite commonplace.