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Sunday, August 29, 2010

Your Views on the News, August 29, 2010

photo from 8/29/10 Washington Post
Yesterday's event staged by Glenn Beck received live coverage, and lots of it, on CNN. According to a tweet by CNN's Sam Feist Fox and MSNBC were 'largely ignoring' the rally. We weren't keeping track but we'll bet some of you were. Opinions?



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Saturday, August 28, 2010

Tuesday August 31, 2010


CNN Plans Special Coverage of President’s Prime Time Oval Office Address on Iraq

CNN anchors Wolf Blitzer and Anderson Cooper will lead live, global coverage of President Barack Obama’s address on Iraq at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, August 31. Anchors Candy Crowley, John King and Fareed Zakaria will join other members of the Best Political Team on Television to discuss and analyze the political and national security implications of the president’s speech and his decision for Iraq. In addition, CNN correspondents will be part of the conversation from around the world, including Ed Henry from the White House, Arwa Damon and Chris Lawrence from Iraq, and chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta from Pakistan.

Special coverage begins on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer at 5 p.m., midnight in Iraq which is the exact time when the United States combat mission there is scheduled to officially end. John King, USA at 7 p.m. will have a preview show with top guests on the issue; Larry King Live and Anderson Cooper 360ยบ will have in-depth analysis following the 8 p.m. address.

CNN.com will live stream Pres. Obama’s address at CNN.com/live and on the CNN App for the iPhone and iPod touch, featuring coverage from CNN’s correspondents in Iraq. CNN.com will also have opinion pieces, picture galleries showcasing Iraq in the past, present and future and up to the minute updates on the Political Ticker. CNN iReport, the network's user-generated news community, is asking users to weigh-in on how Iraq has impacted their lives by following this link.

All Times Eastern

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Friday, August 27, 2010

Sanjay Gupta in Pakistan


CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta will report LIVE from flood-ravaged Pakistan for this weekend’s program. Speaking with flood survivors, Gupta gains a sense of the challenges that they are facing, and learns first-hand from relief workers and medics about the pace of aid reaching those affected. The show includes special reports from other CNN correspondents from around the area.
Click here to see Gupta reports in Sindh, Pakistan.

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CNN at the Emmy's

Part of the fun of watching the Emmy Awards is predicting who's going to snag that golden trophy and talking fashion.
CNN.com's Entertainment section will be live streaming the red carpet before the Emmy’s from 6-8pm ET this Sunday night. This will be the first time CNN has live streamed directly from the Entertainment Section.

There will also be lots of photos on the red carpet as well as up-to-the-minute updates on The Marquee Blog and live tweeting from @CNNshowbiz for all the latest news.





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Thursday, August 26, 2010

Candy Crowley in the News

CNN and the St. Petersburg Times will partner with the University of South Florida to host a nationally televised debate. The Oct. 24 debate will be moderated by chief political correspondent and anchor Candy Crowley during her Sunday program, State of the Union with Candy Crowley. The one-hour debate between Florida Gubernatorial candidates Gov. Charlie Crist (I), Rep. Kendrick Meek (D) and Marco Rubio (R) will be live from USF’s Tampa campus.




Crowley was featured recently in the Washington Post's Style section. It's an excellent read for all you CC admirers out there. Just follow the link.





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Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Ratings For The Week Of 8/16

1 - Based on four nights of regular programming


Rating calculations are weekly averages based on nightly ratings provided by TVNewser with data by Nielsen Media Research. Numbers reflect Live and same day (DVR) data.



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Monday, August 23, 2010

CNN's Seismic Shift

Network is the first to make away-from-home deal

Although this article, written by Anthony Crupi and published yesterday in MediaWeek,wasn't written for the casual CNN viewer it does offer a glimpse into how CNN generates revenue.


After having taken the unprecedented step of offering guarantees against away-from-home deliveries, CNN’s ad sales team has closed its first such agency deal, coming to terms on a multiclient agreement with Starcom. Completed during the 2010-11 upfront, the pact marks the first time a network has written business based on its deliveries in bars, restaurants, hotels and third-party residences.

The clients on Starcom’s roster that agreed to credit CNN’s away-from-home performance are Allstate, DeVry, Kellogg’s, Sears Optical and Walgreens.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Your Views on the News, August 21, 2010


By now many of you have seen TDS's take on Anderson Cooper's interview with Louie Gohmert. We thought it might be a good start for this weekend's conversation.

video


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Friday, August 20, 2010

Mediaite's Lost Interview with CNN's Ed Henry

Medialite did a behind the scenes interview with Ed Henry back in April that just surfaced today. Nothing earth shattering but if you're an Ed fan you'll enjoy it.

video


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Thursday, August 19, 2010

Zakaria Role to Expand at CNN

From Wednesday's NY Observer:


FAREED ZAKARIA JOINS TIME MAGAZINE
New Column, Features in TIME will Complement Expanded Role at CNN and HBO

NEW YORK (August 18, 2010) - TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel announced today that award-winning journalist Fareed Zakaria will join TIME as Editor at Large on October 1. Mr. Zakaria will have a regular column and will contribute cover stories and features in the magazine and on TIME.com.

In addition to his new role at TIME, Mr. Zakaria has renewed his association with CNN, where he will continue to work on his weekly show, "Fareed Zakaria GPS", and, in addition, will produce several special reports a year. He will also serve as a consultant for HBO's documentary unit. TIME, CNN, and HBO are all owned by Time Warner, and the company plans to utilize Mr. Zakaria's expertise across these platforms.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Ratings for The Week Of August 9th

1 - Based on four nights of regular programming

Rating calculations are weekly averages based on nightly ratings provided by TVNewser with data by Nielsen Media Research. Numbers reflect Live and same day (DVR) data.



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Peter Bergen to host special on Osama bin Laden

Peter Bergen will be hosting a new documentary on International Discovery channel next month:

New ID Doc Spotlights Osama Bin Laden
By Kristin Brzoznowski
Published: August 18, 2010

Coinciding with the anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks, Investigation Discovery is to air a new documentary, ID Investigates: Why is Bin Laden Alive?, which looks at how it is possible that no one has been able to capture or kill the al-Qaeda leader.

Hosted by CNN's national security analyst, Peter Bergen, ID Investigates: Why is Osama Bin Laden Alive?, will spotlight the popular conspiracy theories surrounding the disappearance of the world's most notorious villain. The doc also focuses on the continued threat from al-Qaeda. The controversial program is to air on September 12 at 10 p.m. on Investigation Discovery.

“Given the United States’ sophisticated surveillance technology and capabilities, ID will explore the reasons why international forces have not been able to capture a man who killed so many Americans, let alone one who remains an ongoing threat to our safety,” said Henry Schleiff, the president and general manager at Investigation Discovery. “ID is proud to partner with the world-class news unit at the BBC, and world-renowned journalist Peter Bergen, to offer viewers an in-depth examination into the theories surrounding his disappearance, and provide some possible answers—something we’re all looking for.”

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Tuesday, August 17, 2010

'Lives' vs. Reporting the News

There's an interesting article, by MP Nunan, on HuffPo about the fall of CNN. Here's an excerpt, the entire article is after the jump.

The real diagnosis, however, may be deceptively simple. The sad truth is, CNN no longer reports the news. It merely does "lives" -- an endless stream of anchors or talking-heads, blathering on about the subject du jour.

A 24-hour news channel, you see, is a good thing. Live news, more often than not, just blows.

Sunday, August 15, 2010

Your Views On The News, August 15, 2009

I'm not sure if everyone is as bored with CNN speculation as we are? If you're not here are a few short reads for your consideration this week.
Maybe ATC will get it's mojo back when CNN does? One can hope.




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Thursday, August 12, 2010

CNN Covers Katrina 5 Years Later


This month marks five years since Hurricane Katrina roared ashore in Louisiana and Mississippi, killing over 1,800 people and displacing many more. Just as residents were rebuilding their cities and towns after the storm, the Gulf oil disaster has crippled the region's fishing and tourism industries. CNN programming throughout dayside and into primetime will commemorate the 5th anniversary of the storm with special coverage across all platforms that will chronicle how communities, people and businesses have changed over the past five years and how far the region has come in their rebuilding efforts.

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Ratings For The Week Of August 2nd

1 - Ratings based on four nights of regular programming

Rating calculations are weekly averages based on nightly ratings provided by TVNewser with data by Nielsen Media Research. Numbers reflect Live and same day (DVR) data.





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Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Mohammed Jamjoom named Middle East Correspondent

CNN assigned another reporter to full-time duties covering the Middle East. Mohammed Jamjoom has been based in Atlanta (and doing rotations in Baghdad) but now will be based in the Abu Dhabi center.

A few of the stories he's reported on:

October 2009
Mohammed Jamjoom filed a report about medical clinics in Baghdad that are being run on solar power as a way to deal with the still-spotty supply of electricity in the city:

video


April 2009
In Saudi Arabia, women become even more disposable, with a court allowing divorce via text message. Mohammed Jamjoom reports:

video

The story of the 8-year-old Saudi girl who was married off by her male relatives has been in the news quite a bit lately and on Tuesday, International's Mohammed Jamjoom spoke to Wolf Blitzer about the legalities of the case:

video


Here is the CNN press release:

Saudi-born Jamjoom joins CNN’s roster of anchors and correspondents covering the Middle East and his remit includes reporting the day-to-day news from the United Arab Emirates, covering breaking news stories across the region where the network’s newsgathering needs require and continuing as part of the rotation of correspondents reporting for the network from Iraq.

“I’m delighted Mohammed is bolstering our growing team in the Middle East. This appointment signals CNN's continued commitment to the region and investment in our Middle East production hub based in Abu Dhabi which launched in November 2009. He brings additional experience to the region gained from reporting and producing major breaking news stories for CNN and previously in Saudi Arabia. He is a strong talent with an impressive track record and we're pleased viewers will get to know Mohammed much better as he becomes an integral part of our reporting from the region,“ says Parisa Khosravi, senior vice president of international newsgathering for CNN Worldwide.

Jamjoom was most recently based at CNN’s Atlanta headquarters where he was the assignment editor on the international news desk. While in Atlanta, Jamjoom also continued to work extensively on Middle East-based stories for CNN, both as a reporter and producer covering breaking news, politics, human rights and business in Iraq, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. In 2009 and 2010, Jamjoom also travelled to Iraq, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen to produce and report.

He takes up his position mid August.

Jamjoom began his career at CNN as a freelance reporter and producer while he was living in Saudi Arabia in late 2006. His first story for CNN International involved Iraqi conjoined twin girls who underwent successful separation surgery in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and he then worked with the CNN Hajj Coverage team that same year.

Jamjoom then joined CNN's International Desk in late 2007 and until July 2010 worked as a full time assignment editor. While in Atlanta, Jamjoom also continued to work extensively on Middle East-based stories for CNN, both as a reporter and producer covering breaking news, politics, human rights and business in Iraq, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. In 2009 and 2010, Jamjoom also travelled to Iraq, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen to produce and report.

In Iraq, Jamjoom reported on several aspects surrounding the country’s parliamentary election. In April 2010 he interviewed the family of the Iraqi journalist - Saeed Chmagh - killed in a 2007 attack by a US helicopter gunship in Iraq, after WikiLeaks posted a video showing that he was being rescued when the gunship’s crew fired on the van to which he was being carried. He has also worked on CNN’s Iran desk covering stories such as the case of the Iranian mother who was sentenced to be stoned to death after an adultery conviction.

He was part of the team nominated for the 2010 News and Documentary Emmy Awards for CNN's coverage of the story of the failed attempt to down the Northwest Airlines flight from Schipol in the Netherlands to Detroit in the US on 25th December 2009.

In January 2010, Jamjoom travelled to Yemen to produce a series of reports and set up an exclusive interview with Dr. Nasser al-Awlaki, the father of American-born Islamic cleric Anwar al-Awlaki. The CNN team also filed stories on how Umar Farouk AbdulMutallab disappeared in Yemen for more than two months before he allegedly tried to bring down a Northwest Airlines jet with explosives concealed in his underwear, plus how al Qaeda is able to operate across large areas of Yemen.

In May 2010, CNN gained exclusive access to one of Baghdad’s two female juvenile prisons and Jamjoom became the first reporter for a Western television network to file a story from inside.

Prior to joining CNN, Jamjoom worked for Saudi Arabia’s English language Channel 2, where he worked as a co-anchor on its primetime news show; anchored the news-in-brief segments; co-hosted, the morning show 2U; and hosted, wrote and produced for several other programmes for the channel. He also freelance produced and coordinated for other journalists and outlets visiting the Kingdom.

Jamjoom was born in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He spent his childhood living between Saudi Arabia and the United States. He attended Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, where he studied journalism, cinema and history. He is fluent in both English and Arabic.


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Friday, August 6, 2010

Your Views on the News, August 6, 2010

Lots to read, digest and discuss in this article from the September issue of Vanity Fair.

The Gray Lady of Cable News
Many think Jon Klein, president of CNN/U.S., has lost the cable-news war to Fox. But CNN has racked up record profits by being bland.
Article for Vanity Fair by Michael Wolff•Illustration by John Cuneo

Jon Klein is an extremely affable broadcast-news executive, a chinos-and-Docksiders 52-year-old whom almost everybody in the TV-news business likes and believes is not only responsible for CNN’s ignominious ratings decline—it has lost in every prime-time slot for most of the last five years—but also for the collapse of broadcast journalism itself.

Among the inside-baseball television-news diaspora—network-news alums who have lost their jobs and been scattered as the television-news industry has been flattened—Klein and his stewardship of the network rise to a level not just of confounding mismanagement but of moral void in which the best lack all conviction and the worst are full of passionate intensity. In this example of the existential crisis of modern life, not only is CNN being beaten year after year by Fox, but it’s precisely its well-intentioned earnestness that is responsible for the rise of ideological television.

“CNN’s inability to evolve has given the game to Fox and us,” says MSNBC president Phil Griffin.

Thursday, August 5, 2010

CNN Alum's Katrina Book

Kathleen Koch's new book, Rising From Katrina, is being released as we approach the 5th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Baldwin County NOW. com recently posted this interview with the former CNN reporter.
In the memoir, Koch discusses growing up in Bay St. Louis, Miss.; explores how Hurricane Katrina devastated the city and neighboring coastal communities; and the way that shining a national spotlight on the plight of all coastal residents prevented anyone from becoming a mere footnote in the shadow of New Orleans.
“I didn’t want to write just another hurricane book,” Koch said during a recent phone interview from the Clarksville, Md. home she shares with her husband and two daughters. “I wanted people to see the bigger view. These became life and death decisions — whether to stay, whether to go. And the recovery is not a sprint. It’s a marathon.”







FAIRHOPE, Ala. — A reporter usually learns early in their career they should never become personally involved in a story. But if Kathleen Koch hadn’t made a conscious (and long-thought-out) decision to instead do that very thing, an entire community might have been forgotten in the aftermath of one of this nation’s worst natural disasters.


Former CNN White House correspondent Kathleen Koch stands amidst the rubble in Bay St. Louis, Miss., not long after Hurricane Katrina nearly wiped the town off the map. Her new book, “Rising From Katrina: How My Mississippi Hometown Lost It All And Found What Mattered,” is a lesson about how the human spirit can overcome adversity, even when there seems to be little hope left. Photo by Skip Nocciolo/CNN.




The former CNN correspondent will be at Page & Palette, 32 S. Section St. in Fairhope, on Aug. 4, from 6-8 p.m., to sign copies of “Rising From Katrina: How My Mississippi Hometown Lost It All And Found What Mattered.”

In the memoir, Koch discusses growing up in Bay St. Louis, Miss.; explores how Hurricane Katrina devastated the city and neighboring coastal communities; and the way that shining a national spotlight on the plight of all coastal residents prevented anyone from becoming a mere footnote in the shadow of New Orleans.

“I didn’t want to write just another hurricane book,” Koch said during a recent phone interview from the Clarksville, Md. home she shares with her husband and two daughters. “I wanted people to see the bigger view. These became life and death decisions — whether to stay, whether to go. And the recovery is not a sprint. It’s a marathon.”

Koch said the story’s framework first centers on her family moving to Bay St. Louis when she was a teen, and how Hurricane Camille (1969) was at the time the benchmark storm to which future events were compared. As residents from Louisiana to Alabama soon discovered, Katrina’s bite would turn out to be much worse than her bark.

In fact, the physical and emotional scars left by the 2005 storm have not yet faded for many residents there, and those profiled in Koch’s book are not unlike our own neighbors — hardworking men and women, some of whom are still struggling to put the experience behind them.

Although there are dramatic accounts in the book about people struggling to survive as the storm’s wind and waves batter the Gulf Coast, Koch uses them sparingly, choosing to focus on how disasters can bring folks together for the common good.

“I write as a journalist does, about the people with the most compelling stories,” she said. “By telling a story (about people clinging to trees) 10 times, however, the dramatic can become mundane. It’s about people sharing their emotions and thoughts.”

The 24-hour television news cycle, along with the “if it bleeds, it leads” mentality, can often result in such human drama being swept under the rug. Koch said CNN management was very generous though in giving her permission, time and the resources needed to file reports from the Mississippi coast not once, but several times as the weeks and months passed.

She said, “John Klein was the president of CNN at the time. He saw my report. He saw the emotion. He saw how intensely personal it was. He saw that here was someone who could tell the story.”

The network’s coverage of Katrina’s impact earned a George Foster Peabody Award, as Koch anchored several special documentaries that updated the progress made in the years following the storm.

She credits local elected leaders and residents with knowing what needed to be done and acting quickly to accomplish it, even as the Federal Emergency Management Agency sat on the sidelines, mired in bureaucratic snafus.

“On the Mississippi coast, they choose their politicians well,” Koch said. “They would give anything for the town, the place, the people there — to bring it all back the way it was. It’s so heroic.”

The book relates the generosity shown by strangers from across the country who saw the CNN reports, of minor miracles and how the region rolled up its sleeves and rebuilt. It is also the story of this veteran reporter who, struggling to maintain her objectivity amid loss, traveled her own personal path from devastation to recovery.

“Kathleen Koch’s efforts in the national media ensured the Mississippi Gulf Coast was not forgotten,” stated football great and Mississippi native Brett Favre. “Time and time again, she reiterated the message that Katrina came ashore where we both grew up in Hancock County ... We will always be thankful to all the volunteers that gave of their time and resources to help. The random acts of kindness you will hear about in the book can’t help but renew your faith and humble you at the same time. Kathleen captures the challenges, victories and can-do attitude the people of the Mississippi coast exhibited after this horrible disaster. It is a great read.”

Noted author Douglas Brinkley, a Rice University history professor and longtime Bay St. Louis resident whose home along the Jordan River was destroyed by Katrina, stated, “A first-rate reporter, Koch got all the harrowing details exactly right: death-rattle winds, raging storm tide, flying metal debris and the god-awful feeling of rank abandonment.”

Koch became the de facto spokesperson for all Gulf Coast residents who felt they were abandoned, not only by the federal government, but also by the media in its rush to cover New Orleans. She is now a freelance journalist, having been laid off from CNN when a poor economy forced cutbacks across the board within several news organizations.

She said of her former employer, “They understand (the Gulf Coast) is a special place. Even though I’m not there, they’re carrying the banner forward.”

Koch returned to Bay St. Louis in May to celebrate her brother’s birthday. She saw a completed beach highway and some new construction, including the rebuilding of Trapani’s Eatery, a restaurant which had occupied the building that once housed her family’s Sunshine Ice Cream Parlor. Trapani’s was destroyed when Katrina roared ashore, and was temporarily reopened farther inland.

“I hope people understand it’s not just a Katrina book — a hurricane book. It’s about people, their emotions, coming to terms and finding the silver lining,” Koch said.

Can the book’s message be applied to how we deal with the oil spill crisis currently facing the Gulf Coast?

“Yes. Don’t give up. Don’t quit, no matter how bad things are,” she added. “You can get your life back on track. If you stick with it, you can come back. This whole region made it.”

A portion of the proceeds from each book sold will be donated to Pneuma Winds of Hope and LESM Coast Recovery Camps, two nonprofit groups still working on the Katrina recovery effort in Bay St. Louis.




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Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Ratings For The Week Of July 26th And The Month of July

Ratings For The Week of July 26th

1 - Based on four nights of regular programming

Click here for more information on the month's averages.

Larry King's Tie

This isn't a new article, but this story about a well traveled tie & a charity auction recently caught my eye. The auction mentioned in the article was for the food bank of Greater Vancouver. The items being auctioned were ties signed or decorated by celebrities.

[Howard Isman] said getting the ties required a mix of ingenuity, luck and a lot of hard work.

"We get them various ways: some are easy to get, some are difficult to get," he said.

"We pursue them through agents, managers, any way we can ... until we finally find somebody who knows somebody who gets them for us."

Some ties arrive in New Westminster with miles under their belt and a great back-story.

"Last year we were trying to get Larry King from CNN. We sent a tie to his headquarters in Atlanta. We got an e-mail back saying, 'Sorry, Mr. King is not here he's gone to Los Angeles and we are going to forward the tie to LA,' " Isman said.

The tie was sent on but arrived in Los Angeles after King had left for New York. It was then forward to New York where, again, it missed King who had returned to his head office in Atlanta.

"Well, the tie never got to him but he did find out about it from someone in his office. So he sent us his own tie and it got to us a week before bidding closed," Isman said.

"And we had two people very hot for it and we got $300 for his tie."

Source: Delta Optimist, November 05, 2008



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Monday, August 2, 2010

Jeffrey Toobin: The Oath

Jeffrey Toobin, who examined the inner workings of the U.S. Supreme Court in his best seller "The Nine," probes the court under the Obama administration in his new book.

William Thomas, senior vice president, publisher and editor in chief at Doubleday, announced Monday that Toobin's "The Oath: The Secret Struggle for the Supreme Court," will be published in 2012.

"The battle between a conservative court and a liberal president will be one of the central behind-the-scenes dramas of the Obama years," said Toobin, a staff writer for The New Yorker and a senior analyst for CNN.

"The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court" remained on The New York Times list of best sellers for more than four months.

Source: Associated Press via Yahoo News



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Sunday, August 1, 2010

CNN Distinguished Civil Rights Advocate Award

CNN and the Honorable Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson to Receive Lawyers' Committee's Distinguished Civil Rights Advocate Award

The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law will bestow upon CNN and the Honorable Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson its Distinguished Civil Rights Advocate Award at a reception hosted in conjunction with the National Bar Association´s 85th Annual Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana. During the event, hosted at the Marriott New Orleans on Wednesday, August 11, 2010, 4 - 6 p.m., CNN and Justice Johnson will be recognized for stellar civil rights achievements and efforts to champion the cause of equal justice.

"We are delighted to honor CNN and Soledad O'Brien, who will formally accept the award, for their outstanding commitment to coverage of minority and underserved communities," said Lawyers' Committee Executive Director Barbara Arnwine. "Ms. O'Brien's groundbreaking "Black in America" and "Latino in America" series were remarkable. Also, as the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina approaches, it is an added privilege to recognize CNN's unwavering and excellent coverage of the Gulf Coast during and following the most devastating natural disaster in U.S. history, which continues to adversely affect minority and low-income communities."

Said O'Brien, "I am delighted to be accepting the Distinguished Civil Rights Advocate Award on behalf of CNN. We work hard to live up to our diversity mission "We Are What We Air" always seeking to bring all voices to the forefront in our reporting. We are pleased to be recognized by the Lawyers' Committee for our role in shedding light on people and communities impacted by the important civil rights issues of our day."

Source: July 21, 2010 Press Release



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