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Monday, January 18, 2010

Surviving in a Tent City


Soledad O'Brien was reporting from Port-au-Prince, Haiti Sunday night during the 10:00pm ET hour of the CNN Newsroom with Don Lemon. She talked of how tent cities are popping up all over the city. Where people once waited for buses, they are now waiting for food and water. The water has come, but they are still waiting for the food. Here's her report.

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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

So glad to see Soledad there. She has a lot to offer. I believe she speaks quite a few languages and perhaps "creole," or something of the French dialect, having gone to an Ivy league school.
I give her a lot of credit. She's a mother of three, but she's willing to sacrifice for this cause and is not afraid to get her hands dirty or report on something that willl bring despair.
I have no use for Campbell Brown, crying in the NY studios because "it was hard for her to see." Lady, you're a journalist. It isn't always pretty and you're not out in the field. Maybe she should look for a different profession. She can hardly handle this one and I know she's "a mother." So is Soledad and Elizabeth Cohen. "If you can't handle the heat, get out of the kitchen."

Anonymous said...

I can't say enough about Soledad. She is a true journalist. She goes where the story is and doesn't try to become PART of the story. She uses her knowledge to further the cause, and doesn't complain about the anguishes or the injustices, but tells it like it is.
Some journalists have trouble separating themselves from the story, and therefore, they BECOME THE STORY. Emotive journalism is fine, if it isn't overused for self promotion or opportunism.